Posted by & filed under Emergency Preparedness, Food Storage Planning, Water Storage.

water2

Previously: The Big Uh-Oh

Back in part 3 of this series on storing water, I hinted that there was a way to store water using something other than bleach to prevent the growth of algae.  I didn’t tell you about it first because this method is more involved and somewhat expensive, and I wanted you to be able to get started right away storing water with a minimum of cost and delay.

The downside of the easy way of storing water is that you have to change out and replace your water every six months in order to keep it fresh, so over time it ain’t that easy.  Well, here’s a secret: it doesn’t have to be six months on the nose; Just around six months.  But if you wait too long -say a year- you may find your water is stale and maybe even a bit infected. So I would shoot for six months, but not panic if you let it go for seven or eight.

On the other hand, if you find yourself forced to rely on that water nine or ten months after you put put it away and you end up having to drink water that tastes a bit scummy and stale, well, I warned you.

For those who aren’t sure they are up to the task of changing out their water twice a year, or don’t trust themselves to do it timely, the long term storage method may be better for you. If you don’t mind more work.

The Five Year Plan

This alternate method takes a lot more effort up front, but those who advocate for it claim water can be stored this way for up to five years.  But notice that qualifier, “up to.”

I have not tried this method, so I can’t vouch for the results.  It has its advocates and its detractors.   For one thing, no one can guarantee that your water will stay pure and fresh for five years, so I’d taste it occasionally and maybe change it out well before half a decade has passed.

With this method you will not be adding chlorine bleach. Instead you’ll use something called Activated Stabilized Oxygen as the prophylactic against bacterial growth.  Some have said that stabilized oxygen may preserve the water’s purity, but warn that the best stored water can stay fresh tasting for only so long.  Water that has been sitting still for close to five years may tend to get stale.

Stabilized Oxygen is a relative of good old hydrogen peroxide, and it works to maintain the ph balance of water and to keep algae from growing.  This is where it gets more expensive than bleach.  A 32 oz bottle of liquid oxygen will run you $78.00 -but at least the shipping is free.

There are several types of liquid oxygen out there, so there is a very real possibility that you might buy the wrong stuff. Unless you already know what you’re doing, I recommend you get your water storage oxygen from this source because they manufacture theirs specifically for water storage.

Most forms of Liquid Oxygen are intended to be taken internally at the time you drink your water.  That type of liquid oxygen mixes with the acid in your stomach to balance the PH in your body, and I think it’s a good idea to use it daily.  It so happens my brother is an executive with CiliMinerals.com, a manufacturer of ingested liquid oxygen, and as much as I would love to promote my brother’s business, I think for purposes of water storage you should stick to the stuff that is promoted specifically for storing water.

As expensive as this liquid oxygen is, you only use a very small amount per gallon, so if you’re storing only a few of those 7 gallon containers I recommended previously, you can get by with the two ounce bottle, which will only set you back $19.00.  Two ounces should be just enough to treat eight of those 7 gallon jugs.

Buying Stabilized Liquid Oxygen is the easy part.  Before you add something intended to maintain the ph level of your water, you’re going to have to start with water that is already properly alkalized.  This is where the work comes in.  You’re going to have to first test the ph levels of your water and then raise the alkalinity in it. I’ll tell you all about how to do that in part 7.  Have a box of baking soda handy and stay tuned.

Next: Getting the Ph Just Right

18 Responses to “Storing Water Part 6: Your Five Year Water Storage”

  1. CRAIG CAMP

    Where can I buy Stabilized Liquid Oxygen?

    In “Storing Water Part 6: Your Five Year Water Storage”
    (Posted on February 24, 2011 by Rock) you stated ” I recommend you get your water storage oxygen from the above source.” What above source?

    Also, if you use a Water Ionizer Machine, you can easily filter your water with a .001 micron filter while simultaneously easily controlling the the pH. (I have a Jupiter/Melody Ionizer.) As a result, you do not need to go through all the hassle of using baking soda.

    Reply
    • Tim Hager

      As Craig Camp was wondering what is the source of the Stabilized Liquid Oxygen ?

      Reply
  2. Jim Gato

    I missed the blog on the 7gallon containers, who manufactures them, and where can I buy them. Thanks

    Reply
  3. Jean Nooney lll

    The water storage info is great–Is this information available in booklet form and for sale along with efoods other products ? It would be good to have especially when the internet is down or not available– Thanks JNlll

    Reply
    • Rock

      Jean, I’m forwarding your question along. Perhaps in the future they’ll make some of these things available in booklet form. In the meantime, it might be a good idea to print out those that you find useful.

      Reply
    • Rock

      I’ve been trying to get that information myself, Hazel, and I just can’t seem to nail it down. I know adding it to your current water supply is a good idea, but I just don’t know if it’s as effective for your stored water as Stabilized Liquid Oxygen. My personal opinion, though, is that they are pretty close to the same thing. But don’t take my word on that.

      Reply
  4. Rock

    Denise, there is no water storage booklet at this time; just this series of articles. Feel free to print them out.

    Reply
  5. Mel

    I was given two 50 gal metal drums. It contained orange juice concentrate, and I was told that the drum has some type of lining to make it safe for food. I was interested in filling them with water but don’t know how to safely do this. I live in a tropical island and temperatures run in the high 80′s to 90′s most of the time. It probably will be stored against the concrete wall behind my house exposed to the elements. It does have a rubber ring to seal the cover for long term storage. Any suggestions would be helpful… Thanks!

    Reply
  6. BILL GOCKE

    I BUILT MY OWN WATER STORAGE SYSTEM, IF YOU HAV E THE SPACE. USING THE
    LARGEST FOOD GRADE PLASTIC TANK. THESE COME IN MANY SIZES AND
    CONFIGURATIONS. YOUR PRESENT WATER DELIVERY SYSTEM IS PIPED INTO THE
    STORAGE TANK. THEN PIPED INTO THE HOME PLUMBING SYSTEM. AS YOU USE THE WATER, THE TANK IS BEING REPLENTISHED WITH FRESH WATER, JUST LIKE THE HOT WATER TANK. IF A DISASTER OCCURS, TURN THE INCOMING SOURCE
    OFF WITH A VALVE. THE STORED WATER THEN CAN USED AS NEEDED AND IS
    FRESH. I HAVE INSTALLED A BATTERY POWERED 12 VOLT PUMP TO THE SYSTEM, OR YOU COULD USE A HAND POWERED PUMP. MY TANK SIZE IS 1500 GALLONS. THE TANK IS IN OUR BASEMENT.

    Reply
  7. Bo

    I have bought a Berkey and started storing the purified water from the Berkey (into BPA free 5 gallon containers of course). Do I still need to refresh and ad Chlorine to this purified water every 6 months?

    Reply
  8. Donavon

    35% Perioxide, how do you store it and where. If my memory serves me right, we had to store our 35% Peroxide in refrigration and dark glass bottles in the dental service. We used it to bleach flouride stained teeth. If left out in warm temp for a period of time and unscrewed the lid, KaBoom. Forms crystals that is shock sensitive. Maybe I am just dreaming or having flash backs. Any comments?

    Reply
    • Seyma

      I am so sorry to hear you had this scare. I will hope and pray that the rollercoaster ride leevls off a little and that she stays stable. Please let me know Joanne if I can do anything to help with anything up here in Rochester. You are all in my thoughts so much.

      Reply
  9. Patrick

    I have a 2,000 gal indoor hot tub 99>100 degrees and I treat it with the recommended chemicals: Rendezvous Activate, Chlorinating Concentrate, PH +/-, Spa clarifier, Protect Plus, & Natural Clear. I change the water & filters regularly.
    Can I filter and treat this water so that it can be ingested?

    Reply

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